Jake Owens
Three hot boys at a wedding

Three hot boys at a wedding

beardsleyjones:

Boom.
didoofcarthage:

Gold pectoral of a hovering fountain 
Egypt, Late Period, after 600 B.C.
gold inlaid with multicolored glass
The British Museum 

didoofcarthage:

Gold pectoral of a hovering fountain 

Egypt, Late Period, after 600 B.C.

gold inlaid with multicolored glass

The British Museum 

ancient-egypts-secrets:

Ma’at, the Winged Egyptian Goddess of Truth, Justice and Harmony. 
19th Dynasty. 
Tomb of pharaoh Siptah (reign as a child 1197 – 1191 BC). 
Valley of the Kings. Western Thebes. Egypt

ancient-egypts-secrets:

Ma’at, the Winged Egyptian Goddess of Truth, Justice and Harmony.

19th Dynasty.

Tomb of pharaoh Siptah (reign as a child 1197 – 1191 BC).

Valley of the Kings. Western Thebes. Egypt

parkerfitzgerald:

fotojournalismus:

Dmitry GombergAkrak Vazha (The Shepherd’s Way)

Artist’s statement: 

"This is a story about Tusheti - mountain region in the Republic of Georgia. Tusheti lies near the Chechen border and it is culturally closer to Chechens than to Georgians.

The story is about shepherds who travel every summer to their ancestors’ land Tusheti and than return to spend the winter at the bottom of the mountain. Twice a year they travel with their sheep through the pass in the Caucasus which is 3,000 meters high. 

I was staying and documenting life of the Shepherds in the Caucasus mountains for 5 years. These people have been cheese makers since before Christ. Their life is simple and harsh, but beautiful.”

(via 5centsapound)

The best photos you’ll see today.

And yes, I’m including my own.

earthlycreations:

South Mountain Bolt by Jeff McGarth
noahtoly:

Swords into plowshares, literally
Given the state of world affairs, I can’t think of anything more appropriate to post than my favorite photo from our recent road trip. During the trip, we stopped by the Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park, the site of some of the US Civil War’s fiercest fighting and a turning point in the war.
The battles played out not just over days or weeks, but over months, as Union and Confederate forces traded losses (yes, that seems the right way to put it) in an effort to control Chattanooga, “The Gateway to the Deep South,” a city of strategic importance because of the convergence of railroads and waterways.
Two decisive battles, one at the Chickamauga Battlefield Site and one at the Lookout Mountain Battlefield Site, bracketed a months-long siege of Union troops that had retreated to the city after losing in their initial confrontations with Confederate troops. The town was apparently decimated by the siege, during which the Union forces eventually resorted to dismantling homes to use their lumber for firewood.
Sometime after the fighting was over, a woman found a bayonet in a field, and someone in the Roark family “bent and flattened” the blade to make it into a sugar cane knife, which you can see in the photo. The Roark family beat this “sword” into a “plowshare.” As we consider the unrest and violence around the world, this is a symbol of what we hope for. Let us pray for the day when, like the Roark family, we can beat our swords into plowshares.

noahtoly:

Swords into plowshares, literally

Given the state of world affairs, I can’t think of anything more appropriate to post than my favorite photo from our recent road trip. During the trip, we stopped by the Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park, the site of some of the US Civil War’s fiercest fighting and a turning point in the war.

The battles played out not just over days or weeks, but over months, as Union and Confederate forces traded losses (yes, that seems the right way to put it) in an effort to control Chattanooga, “The Gateway to the Deep South,” a city of strategic importance because of the convergence of railroads and waterways.

Two decisive battles, one at the Chickamauga Battlefield Site and one at the Lookout Mountain Battlefield Site, bracketed a months-long siege of Union troops that had retreated to the city after losing in their initial confrontations with Confederate troops. The town was apparently decimated by the siege, during which the Union forces eventually resorted to dismantling homes to use their lumber for firewood.

Sometime after the fighting was over, a woman found a bayonet in a field, and someone in the Roark family “bent and flattened” the blade to make it into a sugar cane knife, which you can see in the photo. The Roark family beat this “sword” into a “plowshare.” As we consider the unrest and violence around the world, this is a symbol of what we hope for. Let us pray for the day when, like the Roark family, we can beat our swords into plowshares.

voyagings:

dave.dave.dave